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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
it to light was found dead in his home. rebecca brooks was arrested this weekend after resigning as ceo of news corp. she is expected to testify tomorrow. this is not her first time appearing before parliament, the clip i'm showing you is from 2003. watch closely. brooks testifying with andy coulson. coulson went on to become david cameron's spokesman and has since resigned and has been arrested in the scandal. >> can i ask, the one element if you ever pay the bliss for information? >> we have paid police for information in the past, and it's been -- >> will you do it in the put? >> it depends on -- >> within the code and within the law, there is a clear public interest and the same holds for private detectives, subterfuge. >> it's illegal for police officers to receive payments. >> no, no, no. i just said within the law. >> this is not only the beginning of the scandal. it's the beginning of the news corporation's attempts at damage control. coulson stepping in to blunt brooks' answers. i spoke with the other british whistleblower about the death of sean hoare and about the spread of a
to wolf blitzer. "situation room" starts right now. >> thanks very much, brook. >>> two weeks before the united states may plunge into financial crisis. plu, media mogul rupert murdoch is just hours away from being grilled and lambasteds by british law makers and now a whistleblower in the growing phone hackl scandal reportedly is dead. and a 77-year-old man defends his home and family from an intruder with a gun. stand by for the dramatic story. that's even more compelling because -- get this -- he's a member of the united states congress. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> the u.s. defaulting on its debt for the first time in history? we can't state it enough, this has enormous consequences for all of us, and time is quickly running out to prevent what the president calls armageddon. let's check in with kate baldwin. she's standing by with the latest. where do the negotiations stand right now? >> the two top republicans in the house. no official readout from the white house, but president obama says we are making progress when asked today by reporters how the deb
newsworthy of large type headlines. two days after she resigned, rebekah brooks walked into a police station for questioning and found herself under arrest. hours later, britain's top police officer, the chief of scotland yard resigned, and he acknowledges that the investigation was inadequate, and steven yates now announcing his resignation. the scandal has been growing steadily after reports that there was a hacking of an answering machine by "news of the world." tomorrow murdoch and his son james are scheduled to appear on a hearing in parliament. cnn will bring you that testimony live. dan rivers is inla london. rebekah brooks is expected to testify tomorrow, and now what are the plans in terms of questioning her tomorrow? >> reporter: well, politicians will have to be careful how they frame the questions to her. in britain, if there is a pending trial or the possibility of a pending trial, you have to be very careful what kind of news coverage is gained from that, because they don't want to prejudge the trial here. they don't want to sway a potential juror one way or the other. and this
and small question. would you agree, ms. brooks, that part of the public concern here is about the closeness of the police and now politicians to "news of the world" and "news international?" >> i think that the public's concern overwhelmingly is the on the interception of voice mails is the idea that anybody could intercept the voice mails of victims of crime, and i think that is the overwhelming concern. >> but there has been a lot of concern voiced over the closeness of the police and the politicians and the "news of the world" and "news international" wouldn't you agree as a matter of fact? >> well, i have seen that "news of the world" has been singled out for that closeness so if you are going to address this and you know this more than anyone on the committee, because of your career as a journalist that it is wholly unfair in the discussing the closeness of police and politicians with the media to single out the "news of the world." >> well, it is a fact, and this has been a criticism and yet, you are on your watch as chief executive of "news international" have a triple whammy, becaus
by members of british parliament. his son, james, and rebecca brooks have also been invited to appear before the hearing. we can go live to westminster. it feels like we're on the deadline hour for learning whether rupert murdoch is going to say yea or nay to appearing. i don't suppose many are expecting him to say oh, go on then. >> i don't think so. for one thing, the parliamentary committees do not have the same powers as congressional committees and certainly they cannot force foreign citizens like rupert and james murdoch to appear before them. there is even a question mark over whether they can really force rebecca brooks, who of course is a british citizen to appear. if anyone buzz does of the three, it is thought that perhaps she will be the most likely. the lawyers at news corp. may be advising against this because of course there is a police investigation going on at the moment and public pressure may not be the best thing for them to be under a at the moment. >> do we know clearly whether or not parliament has the power in any way to compel the likes of rupert or indeed james murd
to hold rebecca broke and -- rebekah brooks and james murdoch to account. this was a summons they could not ignore. >> do the decent thing. the cannot hide away from this level of public anguish. -- you cannot hide away. >> at first, they were reluctant witnesses. rupert murdoch said that he could not attend the session but he was willing to give testimony is an inquiry. rebekah brooks said that "i am available to appear before the committee and welcome the opportunity to do so." she said she would not be able to discuss anything about the police investigation. there was a formal summons. there can even be imprisonment. the threat had worked. the murdochs said they would come and answer the questions. >> in a letter, james murdoch said "i am now coming. i would like to answer them in a different forum." the questions keep coming. why did the news of the world mislead parliament? why did the management failed to find out what was going on and stop it? as for rebekah brooks, we ask about what she told the mps. the mp whose committee will be asking the question was optimistic. >> i hope th
his first in command, rebecca brook, was sort of toeing the appropriate line. so whether there's a cover-up there that reaches the highest levels of newscorp or whether it's just the head of a company where there are problems and he's trying to fix them as best he can, i guess we'll -- we may find out. we may not find out. >> some people seem to feel it's really that connection between the rebecca brook, the "news of the world" editor, formerly, and the power that she really had in politics. and david cameron's former assistant also having worked over at the paper. that there just seems to be this coziness that is making people uncomfortable. >> well, i mean, we have the same thing in washington frankly. there's been a lot of coziness over the years. the white house press corps and the -- and government at all levels. i think that's a problem when people live and work and depend on each other for their livelihood. as the press and powerful people do. but, you know, i think murdoch is probably -- may not be the person this hits. i mean, i wonder if there's -- if there's an equiv
in parliament about it and we carry that live on c-span2. we carry rupert murdoch and rebekah brooks yesterday and we will speak about that. how do you describe to an american audience the importance of "news of the world" as the largest selling sunday newspaper in the country, and the closure of that paper? guest: it was shocking. a lot of people were shocked by the closure. it was a sudden and brutal move, and murdoch's decided that enough was enough -- murdochs decided enough was enough and they had to take this extreme step. "news of the world" set the standard for tabloid journalism. it has been a pretty low standard for recent years, but they have always been in front, always seemed to be getting the best spooks, the best gossip -- best scoops, the best gossip. "news of the world" and "the sun," the murdoch daily tabloid, were the epitaph of tabloid journalism. -- epitome of tabloid journalism the rocket. raucous, titillating tabloid journalism, which we enjoy to extan extent. host: did you know, when you were living in london, rebekah brooks at all and her work? guest: she was editor of
to know about the relationship with a back of trucks. what did they talk about? -- rebecca brooks. >> news international has revealed e-mails. he authorized a huge payments to corrupt police officers. that would seem to constitute a criminal offense. he was a witness in the trial for the scottish politician. tom sheridan past him, did the news of the world's a corrupt police officers? he replied, not to my knowledge. four words but not require extensive explanation. his lawyer called on the police to investigate. >> when the company announced two days ago that he had offered up payments to police officers for information, he told the jury that he has no knowledge of payments to police officers. someone is misleading us. he has to answer a perjury charge and that is very serious. >> news international took the action simply not available to david cameron. faced with a scandal that threatens to infect the whole organization, rupert murdoch has taken a knife to his own awkward flesh. >> an extraordinary moment. the victim of its own hocking scandal. >> they are ending a 168-year- old title. >
and gave a full and sincere apology. >> rupert and james murdoch and rebecca brooks will be forced to appear here in a committee and grill eed closelily politicians who want answers as to how all of this activity went on. one of the people who will be interrogating rebecca brooks had some tough words for her. >> i think he was inevitable. rebecca brooks has given the resignation message she should have given on day one of this scandal when nick davis of the uk "guardian" revealed milly's phone had been hacked. >> but the political dimensions continue to evolve as well. downing street has been forced to put out a list of guests that the prime minister david cameron welcomed to his country residents checkers. mo among them was the now disgraced former editor of "the news of the world." a man hired as director of communications. he visited the prime minister three months after he was forced to step down from that high profile political role. wolf? >> dan rivers in london, much more on this story coming up later. meanwhi meanwhile, libyan rebels locked in heated battle while gadhafi's
summoned murdoch's son james and former "news of the world" editor rebecca brooks. >>> in london today, the parents of murdered teen milly met political leaders in parliament. salley and bob say the phone hacking investigation nuft look at politician's ties to the media, and dowlers say it fueled this. they were given false hope she was alive. it led to other disclosures of hacking or hacking attempts that reached all the way to the royal throne. >>> well, stocks are treading water today. the dow chips have been moving between positive and negative territory all morning. the dow jones down about 16 points or so. investors are perhaps taking a breather on negotiations over the debt ceiling playing out in washington. >>> president obama says there's a groundhog day feeling at the white house. he and congressional leaders immediate again today to work on a deal to raise the nation's borrowing limit. republicans are insisting on deep cuts only. the president wants to close tax loopholes as well. now, the debt ceiling deadline is three weeks from today. and so far, nobody is blinking. >>> i
on the republican side. david brooks wrote, if the republican party were a normal party, it would take advantage of this amazing moment. it is being offered the deal of the century. trillions of dollars in spending cuts in exchange for a few hundred billion in revenue increases. for now the republican party cannot take the obama deal and he knows it. it has freed him to offer better and better deals giving him credit for compromising, but they can't say yes because of the tax part, but eventually the republicans have to agree to something, and that is where obama's plan might fail his party. after he cut taxes in 19 81, ronald reagan signed three bills attempting to get debt under control, and 88% of the deficit reduction in the bills came from, wait for it, tax increases. if reagan were president today, the tea party would be primarying the gipper. >>> and then in 1990, george h.w. bush struck a deficit deal which was two-thirds spending cuts and one-third tax increases. clinton then signed his deficit deals in '93 and '97 and like bush two-thirds spending to one-third tax increases. when the d
murdoch, his son james, and reb ekah brooks. bbc newsnight tell us tell they are covering the story. >> tonight, robert mcdowell on the fcc's action to begin cracking down on unauthorized service charges to cell phone bills. that is tonight on "de communicators -- "the communicators." the nuclear regulatory agency officially make recommendations within 90 days. the industry would have five years for any new regulations to come from the process. >> we are honored to be here today, speaking at this venerable institution. the national press club is a venue like no other. it has been at the center of washington news. as i was preparing for this, in my staff did a little investigation, they understood the historic emblem was that of an owl. i will not claim wisdom and i will let you judge my awareness, but i can relate to the long nights spent sleepless on the job. as chairman of the new tillage -- the nuclear regulatory commission, one of the best aspects of my job is having the opportunity to lead a staff of nearly 4000 talented public servants. we hear from all sides and all perspecti
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)